Home

Patients with glioblastoma, a persistent and difficult to treat brain cancer, often end up suffering through multiple rounds of chemo and radiation therapy. Scientists at MIT have been working on harnessing the power of artificial intelligence to better optimize the therapy dosages, sparing the patients the brunt of the treatments while maintaining their clinical effectiveness. Their software, which uses a technique called reinforced learning, assesses different data points about a given patient, and uses information obtained from thousand of previous similar cases to produce a treatment plan that is better...
DripAssist by Shift Labs is an infusion rate monitor that offers a significant improvement in portability, efficiency, durability and ease of use over traditional infusion monitors. The last time Medgadget reported on Shift Labs, the company had just received their CE mark for DripAssist. The device is also FDA approved. Now, Shift Labs is announcing a partnership with Option Care Enterprises, one of the nation's largest and most trusted providers of home and alternative treatment site infusion services. With over 1,800 pharmacists, nurses, and dieticians, Option Care services patients requiring monoclonal...
The University of Texas at Arlington has obtained a patent for a highly sensitive electronic skin that may one day give prosthetic devices a keen sense of touch. The e-skin features a dense forest of flexible zinc oxide nanowires on its surface. As it comes in contact with something, each nanowire generates a small electric signal that indicates that is has been touched. The device itself doesn't require any external power source, as the nanowires  are able to create their own electric current that's enough to produce a useful signal....
A pilot study is getting underway to evaluate a new Medtronic implantable cardioverter defibrillator that doesn't require leads to be placed inside the heart or veins. The Extravascular Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (EV ICD) system can deliver defibrillation shocks as well as pacing signals to the heart, but it uses only a single lead placed under the sternum outside the heart. The electronic implant itself is no larger than existing conventional ICDs and is placed a few inches (centimeters) below the armpit. The first implant has already taken place at New Zealand's...
Researchers from Harvard and MIT have developed microparticles that can treat a specific genetic subtype of glioma, a brain cancer. The microparticles slowly release a drug that specifically targets cancer cells that rely on a particular enzyme. During surgery to remove the brain tumor, clinicians can conduct a rapid (30 min) genetic test on a biopsy sample to see if the tumor is suitable for treatment. If so, they can place the microparticles into the resection site to kill cancer cells at the resection boundary and help to prevent tumor...
Immuno-oncology, a rapidly developing field that harnesses the body's immune system to attack cancers, lacks effective methods of testing potential therapies. In addition to animal studies, tiny bits of tumors are placed, along with chemical compounds being tested, within multiwell plates and watched over using a number of techniques. While this has allowed the field of immuno-oncology to progress quite well, the tumor fragments being tested don't survive for long on their own, the complexity of the actual tumor is not well represented, and how the immune cells interact with...
Caretaker Medical, a firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia, won approval to introduce its Caretaker 4 wireless continuous non-invasive blood pressure (CNIBP) and vital signs monitoring system in the European Union. The product, already approved in the U.S., provides beat-by-beat blood pressure measurements with an accuracy sufficient for intensive care units. It also keeps track of the heart rate, SpO2, and core body temperature, continuously streaming all this data via Bluetooth to the nurse's station, in-hospital electronic medical records, tablets, or other systems and devices. The device doesn't use a typical upper arm...
Researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi (yes, there is such a thing) have developed a method to 3D print functional and inexpensive microfluidic probes for cancer research. The technique could make microfluidics more accessible, allowing researchers to easily design and produce their own devices, and conduct cell-based healthcare research, such as studying cancer cells, more easily. Microfluidic devices are used by researchers to study and manipulate live cell cultures. Their small size allows for unique experiments that would be more difficult on a larger scale. Microfluidics typically consist of small channels...
Nanomedicine requires the nanoparticles that are administered to be properly absorbed by the body. Given orally via a pill, nanoparticles mostly end up being metabolized and/or excreted by the gastrointestinal system. Researchers at the University of Utah have now come up with a way of making nanoparticles much easier to uptake by the body through the GI system. The research team attached glycocholic acid to the nanoparticles. Glycocholic acid is a biliary acid that works to transfer fat from the small intestine into the blood stream. The acid molecule works similarly...
Health4TheWorld, a Silicon Valley start-up providing education and technology solutions for resource-poor communities worldwide, has been named the 2018 Stevie Silver Award Winner by the American Business Awards for the category of Services. Created in 2002, the Stevie Awards are meant to "honor and generate public recognition of the achievements and positive contributions of organizations and working professionals worldwide." One of the competition judges described Health4TheWorld as, “One of the best uses of technology to help patients with limited access to healthcare.” Commenting on the recognition, Dr. Bhavya Rehani, President, CEO, and...
The future of advanced implantable medical devices may depend on whether new, biocompatible sources of power can be developed. Batteries that work inside the body and eventually disintegrate may be important for devices that themselves can be resorbed. Researchers at Binghamton University have now developed a fully biodegradable battery that, though not directly designed for medical applications, may point to a new age in which tiny, electrically powered devices can be implanted to perform limited tasks and that don't have to be removed after their job is done. The "biobattery"...

« Older EntriesNewer Entries »

Medicine

Cardiology

Surgery

Emergency Medicine

Radiology

Anesthesiology

MED TECH THAT TRANSFORMS THE WORLD

Exclusive Medgadget news in your mailbox!

Your information will never be shared with any third party.

X