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Tissue biopsies of skin lesions can be unpleasant and quite painful. Moreover, a biopsy typically doesn't sample the whole lesion and doesn't provide much information about a given lesion's size and depth. Now, scientists at Rutgers University have developed and tested a new device that relies on two different mechanisms to analyze skin lesions. The new "virtual biopsy" device relies on vibrational optical coherence tomography to analyze tissue. It delivers pulses of near-infrared light, along with sound clicks, into the target tissue. The combination technology can identify how deep a...

June 18th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
Assessing the health of tissues deep inside the body is a major need and challenge in medicine. Imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound provide very little information about the composition and environment of tissues being examined. Now, researchers at the University of Edinburgh, Heriot-Watt University, and Bath University, all in the UK, have developed an ultra-thin probe, similar to a fine piece of hair, that can measure the pH and oxygen concentration deep within the lungs. The same technology, slightly modified, has potential in other parts of the...

June 17th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
A couple of years ago a team of U.S. and U.K. scientists came up with a way of making molecular motors that can drill through cancer cells, destroying them in the process. The researchers, from Rice University, Durham University, and North Carolina State University, used an ultraviolet (UV) light source to energize these motors, but such light is dangerous and can cause a host of unintended consequences. Now, the same team has managed to use a phenomenon called two-photon absorption, powered by a near-infrared laser, to activate the motors, avoiding...

June 17th, 2019 by Digital Marketing for Med Devices
Life science organizations successfully increase sales when all departments collaborate to enhance results. Sharing information between departments can focus on fulfilling the needs of customers and strengthening commercial performance. At the 9th Digital Marketing for Medical Devices, taking place on August 5–7 in Minneapolis, attendees will learn to work together and share information for the latest devices and compare efforts to grasp the interest of physicians and other key stakeholders. Kick off the first day with our Marketing and Sales Collaboration Day and hear from industry professionals on the featured sessions below: Streamline...
Researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University have developed a new microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device that aims to more accurately model the complex biological properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Their work, recently published in Nature Communications, demonstrates the device is able to mimic the highly selective drug and antibody uptake previously only seen within in vivo systems. This development can help advance drug discovery to treat brain diseases and potentially help improve understanding of conditions resulting from BBB dysfunction. Prior in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier have been...

June 14th, 2019 by Siavash Parkhideh
Researchers from Stanford University have developed a new AI tool, dubbed HeadXNet that detects brain aneurysms from computed tomographic angiography (CTA) scans. Their work, recently published in JAMA Network Open, demonstrates that their AI tool helped radiologists identify 6 more scans with aneurysm for every 100 scans already diagnosed with aneurysm. This is an exciting development for the millions of Americans who experience intracranial aneurysms, and can help improve detection and clinical outcomes. Currently, about three percent of the American population will suffer from intracranial aneurysms at some point in...
CorMatrix, a company out of Roswell, Georgia, has won FDA clearance for the Cor PATCH epicardial patch. The device is indicated for use at the locations of aneurysms, in adults who have suffered a heart attack that led to the ventricular walls becoming thinner, or anywhere else where structural support or repair of the heart would be helpful. The patch is made using the new generation of the CorMatrix ECM extracellular matrix, which, unlike other competing devices derived from animal tissues, does not have any nuclear remnants, bits of cell wall,...
Researchers at Florida Atlantic University have developed a microfluidic chip that can rapidly assess blood samples from sickle cell disease patients to help monitor the disease. The technique is much faster and more convenient than traditional optical microscopy assessments. Sickle cell disease affects approximately 100,000 individuals in the U.S. and millions of people throughout the world. Red blood cells in those affected become misshapen (forming a “sickle” shape) and sticky, and can block blood flow and break down. This can lead to a variety of serious symptoms, such as organ...
Lasers are known to do remarkable things in medicine, but their use in targeting diseased tissue is not as widespread as everyone expected it to be decades ago. One issue is that lasers are pretty indiscriminate and traditionally have beams that are still too large for extremely fine work. Researchers at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences have developed a laser so small that it can fit inside a cell and shine from within. Being able to produce coherent, high power light from the interior of cells leads to...
MX3 Diagnostics, a startup with offices in Austin, Minneapolis, and Melbourne, Australia, has unveiled its first product, a saliva-based hydration testing system. The MX3 Hydration Testing System can be used by athletes, travelers, and maybe even clinicians to test patients, and is promoted by the manufacturer to be of "lab-quality". The testing device can upload readings to its cloud platform, which can be utilized to track one's hydration levels over time. It relies on single-use disposable test strips that require a tiny amount of saliva to function properly. They are...
Soft tissue wounds and incisions are generally closed using sutures and staples, but those leave marks behind and can be very unpleasant for patients. In some cases, such as cosmetic surgery, specialty adhesives are used to fuse tissues together. However, these can be toxic and they tend to solidify into a harder form than native tissue. Researchers from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have created a soft biocompatible glue, and an accompanying glue gun, that can close wounds and incisions quickly and easily, and which does not cause toxic side effects....

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Molecular Motors Drill Through Cancer Cells

A couple of years ago a team of U.S. and U.K. scientists came up with a way of making molecular motors that can drill through cancer cells, destroying them in the... June 17th, 2019

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