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The company received its FDA clearance in 2016 when it transformed the traditional urinary catheter into a smart sensing platform that helps to accurately monitor vital signs in real-time, such as urine output (UO) and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). Traditional urinary catheters have issues draining urine from the bladder, causing inaccurate UO measurements. Using active drain line clearance, the Accuryn® Monitoring System automatically clears the drainage line as needed. Hayward, California - July 15, 2019 – Potrero Medical has received CE mark in the European Union for its technology platform, the...
Researchers at Tufts University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a new lipid nanoparticle which can deliver CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tools into organs with high efficiency, suggesting that the system is promising for clinical applications. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is currently being investigated as a way to treat a variety of diseases with a genetic basis, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Huntington’s, and sickle cell disease. While the system has significant promise, there are some issues that need to be resolved before it can be used clinically. CRISPR/Cas9 is a...

July 15th, 2019 by Siavash Parkhideh
Researchers from Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland have developed new nanoparticles for theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) applications. Their work describes the synthesis of these particles and demonstrates that by stimulating at a long, safe wavelength, the nanoparticles can cleave bonds that hold onto drugs and release them into the body. This is an exciting development for the field of nanomedicine, and may one day lead to improved detection and treatment of many diseases, including cancer. Nanoparticles have been developed in the past for theranostic applications, but they tended...
Undergraduate researchers at John Hopkins University have developed a cryoablation probe for breast cancer, which uses carbon dioxide instead of argon, making it more affordable and accessible for use in low resource regions.   Treatments for women with breast cancer are scarce in poorer places. In fact, survival rates can be as low as 12% for breast cancer patients in places such as The Gambia, compared with 90% in the United States. Treatments that are commonly used in wealthier countries, such as surgery or chemotherapy, are either too expensive or...

July 12th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
A two-year-old girl has received a deep brain stimulation (DBS) device to treat her dystonia. The condition, which results in painful random muscle movements, spasms, and the like, can lead to severe limitations on a child's development and overall quality of life. A team at the Evelina London Children's Hospital worked together to develop the necessary anesthesia protocols and surgical procedure. One of the issues that the team had to consider was that DBS systems are made for much larger patients, and so the device had to be positioned and...

July 12th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
Scientists at MIT have taken inspiration from cucumber tendrils, the helical offshoots that grab onto fences and anything else they can, to create artificial muscle-like fibers. The new fibers can quickly contract and expand, and can lift objects many times their weight. The hope is that these may one day find their way into medical devices to help power ailing hearts, to give arm and leg prostheses more strength and agility, and to restore injured muscle tissue. Using a fiber-drawing technique, these mini muscles are created with different polymers, each...

July 12th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
Neurolief, an Israeli company, has won European regulatory clearance (CE Mark) for its Relivion system to treat migraines. Intended as an over-the-counter product, the non-invasive Relivion device delivers pulses of electric current into the patient's brain. The headset is designed to stimulate the occipital and trigeminal nerves and the amount and type of modulation can be controlled via an app on a paired smartphone. "I believe that the Relivion device from Neurolief has great potential to improve acute migraine therapy," said Alan Rapoport, M.D., clinical professor of neurology at The...
Today's arthroscopic instruments that are used to perform minimally invasive procedures on hips, knees, and other parts of the body, are rigid devices. They also tend to be one-size-fits-all solutions that surgeons have to use on patients with varied anatomies. Now, a team at the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision are working on being able to make custom robotic instruments that align with a given patient's anatomy. The idea is that a knee, for example, would be imaged using an MRI machine and the resulting scan used to define where...

July 11th, 2019 by Medgadget Editors
Diagnosing rheumatoid (RA) arthritis often involves subjective assessment of patient hands, X-rays, blood tests, and ultrasound imaging. Researchers at Birmingham University in the UK have now developed a system that they hope will offer a more objective way of diagnosing RA. Their system uses infrared spectroscopy and 3D imaging to generate volumetric maps of blood within a patient's hand. Conventional optical imaging is used to scan the hand and create a model of it. Subsequently, infrared light is illuminated through each of the fingers and what comes out is evaluated....
Two years ago the FDA issued the first clearance for a high-field MRI scanner, the Siemens MAGNETOM Terra. Featuring a 7 Tesla magnet, the device generates a magnetic field more than twice the strength of the 3 Tesla scanners that were previously the most powerful for clinical use. Now, a team of researchers, headed by a group at Massachusetts General Hospital, has used the machine to scan a donated brain for nearly five days. The result is an incredible visualization of a complete brain at a resolution of almost .1...

July 11th, 2019 by Siavash Parkhideh
Researchers from Texas A&M University have developed a new wireless device that allows for direct illumination during surgeries. This is an exciting development that can improve surgical illumination, make many existing procedures easier to perform, and potentially reduce complication rates. Regardless of how skilled a physician is, there are some risks associated with surgery. One of the factors that increases risk is if the surgical area is poorly illuminated. This can be due to obstructions from the surrounding anatomy, or poor overhead lighting. A new system combines the surgical patty,...

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New Device to Improve Surgical Illumination

Researchers from Texas A&M University have developed a new wireless device that allows for direct illumination during surgeries. This is an exciting development... July 11th, 2019

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