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Lumendi, a company based in Buckinghamshire, England, won European regulatory approval for its DiLumen Endolumenal Interventional Platform (EIP). The one-time-use device fits over typical endoscopes to provide stability when visualizing, diagnosing, and treating conditions within the large intestine. It works by inflating two balloons that squeeze against the lumen of the large intestine. One of the balloons is positioned ahead of the distal tip of the endoscope, while the other is located behind the tip. The two are attached to each other via two metal rods, but the endoscope's tip is...
When it comes to anti-cancer drugs, it's not only their effectiveness at killing the intended target that we want to know, but also their ability to reach and penetrate the cancer cells. Knowing whether the drug actually enters cancer cells can be as important as whether it's effective once inside. Now researchers at Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London, both in the UK, have developed a technique that lets them measure a drug's penetration into cells in situ. This is important, as laboratory studies on small groups of cells may...
Glaukos, based in San Clemente, California, won FDA approval to introduce its iStent inject Trabecular Micro-Bypass System in the United States. The device, designed to treat mild to moderate primary open-angle glaucoma, is implanted alongside cataract surgeries to reduce intraocular pressure. The implant is tiny, measuring only 0.23 mm x 0.36 mm, and Glaukos believes it is the smallest device ever approved by the FDA. It's positioned to allow for fluid to move through the trabecular meshwork, producing flow in both direction within the Schlemm's canal. Some details about the study that led to the...

July 17th, 2018 by Brad Spannbauer
The humble fax machine has been a regular fixture within healthcare offices for as long as most of us care to remember. Even in 2018, with so much modern technology at our disposal, fax machines continue to dominate an otherwise rapidly evolving technological industry. One study suggests fax accounts for a substantial 75%[1] of all medical communication today. There are reasons behind this, of course. A 2017 report by IDC found that many businesses continue to use fax, not because they enjoy it, but because they’re left with little other...
The Johnson & Johnson Institute has recently launched a virtual reality training program designed to prepare orthopedic surgeons and nurses for a couple common procedures. The program will expand to other surgeries, but for now it's focusing on total knee replacement with direct anterior approach and hip fracture treatment with a proximal femoral nail. The hope is that using virtual reality to learn and practice surgical techniques will help improve clinical outcomes for patients. We spoke with David Badri, Virtual Reality and WW Professional Education at Johnson & Johnson, about the...
Alzheimer's disease seems to develop over many years, if not decades, before symptoms begin to show up. In order to better understand its development, researchers have been looking for new ways to track the formation of amyloid plaques within the brain, which are the best known biomarkers of Alzheimer's. Researchers at Purdue University recently developed a so-called super-resolution "nanoscope" that can show molecular-level details of the composition of tissues and recently they optimized the technology to look deep into the brain. Using the new method, researchers at Indiana University were able...
Stryker won FDA pre-market approval for its Surpass Streamline Flow Diverter, a device indicated for treatment of large and even giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms. This is only the second flow diverting stent to be approved in the U.S., the first being from Medtronic. "Surpass Streamline is the first flow diverter indicated for large and giant posterior communicating artery aneurysms.  These unruptured aneurysms are more challenging due to their location and surrounding anatomy.  Having Surpass approved for this and other locations is an important advantage for physicians and patients," in a published...
Scientists at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology have come up with a surprising way of fighting tumors and in the process showed that our brains have a role in preventing the growth of cancers. The researchers, who reported their findings in journal Nature Communications, artificially stimulated the reward system of mice stricken with cancer. What the investigators showed is that over time, the mice that received stimulation had significantly smaller tumors than control mice that were not administered the therapy. The team believes that their stimulation affected the nervous...
Compliance with medications is considered one of the best ways for patients to stay on track in managing their health. However, driving adherence is a complex problem influenced by not only medical, but also economic, social, and geographic factors. Ensuring patients continue taking their medications, while understanding and addressing the source(s) of an individual's tendency to unintentionally or intentionally miss a dose, represents the goal of many medication adherence programs. Recent innovations in digital health have tackled medication adherence with software, hardware, and combined solutions to achieve this goal. One...
Earlier this year, Medgadget spoke with Noble International about the company's self-injection trainers designed to mimic the patient experience with prefilled syringes and autoinjectors. During the interview, we heard about AdhereIT, "a smart attachable device component, available for various autoinjector form factors, that connects to the device and has the capability to track, monitor and guide patients not only through device training but also actual self-injections." Recently, Noble officially launched the "smart" AdhereIT platform, which includes features like detecting when the injection device makes contact with the injection site on the...
Mosquitoes are usually only an unpleasant nuisance, but when they're carrying diseases we only find out once people start showing up sick at hospitals and clinics. A spinoff from Purdue University is hoping to give public health professionals, and mosquito eradication programs, an early warning system to know where to direct their resources. The company, called SMK Diagnostics that's headquartered in West Lafayette, Indiana, has developed a sensor that can identify the presence of infectious viruses within mosquitoes and to name specifically which flaviviruses they are. The technology, which consists...

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Medicine

Cardiology

TEECAD Camera Gives Vision to TEE Probes

A young medtech company called Visura Technologies, based outside of Chicago, won FDA clearance for its TEE Camera Assist Device, TEECAD for short. The device is... July 10th, 2018

Surgery

Emergency Medicine

Radiology

Anesthesiology

TEECAD Camera Gives Vision to TEE Probes

A young medtech company called Visura Technologies, based outside of Chicago, won FDA clearance for its TEE Camera Assist Device, TEECAD for short. The device is... July 10th, 2018

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