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Researchers at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have developed a method to isolate intact lysosomes from cells. The technique is rapid and produces samples of high purity. Lysosomes are the garbage-disposal organelles within a cell, and they are involved in numerous diseases, from lysosomal storage diseases to autoimmune disorders, certain cancers, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, they are difficult to study, as current techniques to isolate lysosomes from cells result in samples with poor purity and damaged or altered lysosomes. This new approach uses nanotechnology to rapidly extract...Read More

January 12th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at Orel State University in Russia have developed a biopsy system that can distinguish between healthy and cancerous tissue in many clinical cases. The device is designed to address the difficulties that clinicians may experience when trying to obtain a biopsy of a liver tumor, where it can be difficult to know if the needle is in the correct location with small, early-stage tumors. The system uses a combination of lifetime fluorescence measurements and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to identify a tumor. Obtaining a tumor biopsy is an important first...Read More

January 12th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at Penn State working with collaborators have developed a nanomaterial that can ‘mop up’ chemotherapeutics in the bloodstream, helping to reduce off-target effects. The technology is intended for use in situations where a chemotherapeutic can be delivered precisely to the site of a tumor, and not in situations where it is delivered systemically. The cellulose particles have a large number of polymer chain “hairs” that protrude from each end, that increase their ability to bind drug molecules in the blood. Chemotherapy can be incredibly difficult for patients who undergo...Read More
Scientists at RIKEN research institute in Japan have developed a new method to bind gold electrodes to each other within flexible electronics. The technique, which does not require adhesives or high temperatures that can damage delicate electronic components, allows for extremely thin and flexible electronics and could lead to new types of medical wearables. The team’s method relies on exposing tiny gold electrodes to water vapor plasma before binding them together. The plasma generates hydroxyl groups that help to bind the gold surfaces together, and the process can take place...Read More

January 5th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
At the University of Missouri a team of researchers developed a custom finger clip device that can continuously measure a variety of vitals, including blood pressure. The novel device represents a new way to measure vitals, and contains two commercial photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors that operate at two different points on the finger. This approach allows the researchers to simultaneously calculate pulse wave velocity and also measure blood oxygen saturation, body temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate. Continuous blood pressure measurements can reveal trends that a single measurement can miss. Moreover,...Read More

January 4th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at MIT have designed a quantum sensor to detect SARS-CoV-2. While the device is still theoretical, the researchers have used mathematical simulations to show its potential, and the data and design indicate that it may be faster, more accurate, and less expensive than the current gold-standard technique, PCR. The system is based on nanodiamonds to which viral RNA binds, causing a change in the magnetic properties of the system and leading to a measurable change in fluorescence. It looks as if COVID-19 is here to stay, and unless the...Read More
Researchers at University of California San Diego have developed a tiny ‘pop-up’ sensor that can measure the electronic signals propagating inside cardiac cells. The technology consists of tiny spike-like protrusions that can penetrate cell membranes without causing damage, and which can detect electrical signals within individual cells and between cells in 3D tissue samples. The device could provide new insights into cardiac diseases, including myocardial infarction and arrhythmias. Cardiac tissue is intrinsically dependent on electrical activity for correct function, and measuring this accurately on a single cell level and intercellularly...Read More
Blackrock Neurotech, a medical technology company based in Salt Lake City, created a suite of brain-computer interface systems with the goal of empowering patients to have increased independence and quality of life. This latest technology aims to restore written communication in patients who have difficulties in this regard, such as those affected by paralysis. The company's new system, which Blackrock aims to make available in late 2022, allows patients to type text by merely imagining themselves writing or typing the words. The system uses machine learning to decode neural signals...Read More
We have all been living through a life-altering pandemic. As a result, words such as “oxygenation” and “pulse oximetry” have become mainstream and the general public has increased the use of pulse oximeters. This should come as no surprise since hypoxia (i.e., low blood oxygen level) is one of the hallmarks of COVID-19 pneumonia. Today, there are many affordable personal pulse oximeters on the market. Traditional clip-on designs have several limitations. For example, they do not allow continuous monitoring, which may be indicated for some individuals. Thus, Wellue, a Chinese-based...Read More

December 22nd, 2021 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany have developed a light-activated form of the enzymes that power the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The assay has gained recent fame among the general public because of its use as a COVID-19 diagnostic tool. The technique could lead to alternatives to current heat-activated enzymes, which are difficult to design and create, and are not suitable for enzymes that are easily damaged by high temperatures. The method may help to expand the scope of what is possible with PCR. PCR has been around for...Read More
Respira Labs, a medtech company based in California, created the Sylvee sensor, an adhesive patch that the user wears on their lower rib cage, and which monitors respiratory health. The device works through acoustic resonance, whereby it emits sound into the chest cavity and analyzes the echoed vibrations. The measured data provide information on lung air volume and correlate with the amount of air that is trapped in the lungs, which can offer a warning sign that a respiratory exacerbation is possible. With many COVID-19 patients experiencing impaired breathing for...Read More

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Medicine

Hairy Nanocrystals Capture Chemo Drugs

Researchers at Penn State working with collaborators have developed a nanomaterial that can ‘mop up’ chemotherapeutics in the bloodstream, helping to reduce... January 12th, 2022

Finger Clip for Blood Pressure Monitoring

At the University of Missouri a team of researchers developed a custom finger clip device that can continuously measure a variety of vitals, including blood... January 5th, 2022

Cardiology

Finger Clip for Blood Pressure Monitoring

At the University of Missouri a team of researchers developed a custom finger clip device that can continuously measure a variety of vitals, including blood... January 5th, 2022

Surgery

New Hydrogel Material for Vocal Cord Repair

Researchers at McGill University developed a tough hydrogel that can resist mechanical forces found in the body. However, the material still provides a friendly... December 6th, 2021

Emergency Medicine

Radiology

Anesthesiology

Finger Clip for Blood Pressure Monitoring

At the University of Missouri a team of researchers developed a custom finger clip device that can continuously measure a variety of vitals, including blood... January 5th, 2022

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