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August 11th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Engineers at MIT have created an ultrasound patch that can provide long-term ultrasound imaging of internal organs and structures. The device contains a rigid piezoelectric probe array and uses an underlying layer of elastomer-covered hydrogel in lieu of the gel applied to the skin during conventional ultrasound procedures. At just the size of a postage stamp, the ultrasound patch is highly portable and less expensive than conventional ultrasound technologies. The current iteration of the device requires a wired connection to view the images, but the researchers are working to make...Read More

August 11th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale) in France, and collaborators, have developed a DNA-based nanorobot called the Nano-winch. The tiny creation is made using DNA molecules and a “DNA Origami” approach. The tiny robot is so small that it can land on a cell surface and interact with ‘mechanoreceptors’ that the cell uses to sense mechanical forces acting on it. The robots can apply tiny forces to the mechanoreceptors, allowing the researchers to measure the biochemical and molecular changes that result. While the...Read More
X-trodes, a medtech startup based in Israel, created Smart Skin, a wireless monitoring and analytics technology that is suitable for at-home sleep monitoring. At present, diagnosing sleep disorders is an arduous and expensive business, requiring patients to attend a specialized sleep clinic and wear bulky and uncomfortable equipment, all while attempting to sleep in a strange environment. Part of the problem is that many technologies used for sleep monitoring require patients to be tethered to stationary equipment with wires. This means that patients must sleep on their back and limit...Read More
Many of us can attest to the lumbar pains related to sitting at a desk for endless hours week after week. Even despite using an ergonomic office chair, the reality is that your muscles still need to be stretched and stimulated, otherwise you’ll still end up feeling sore. High-end massage chairs – don’t get me wrong, there’s a reason they are popular – often look like the pilot’s seat of a spacecraft out of a sci-fi movie with more buttons on the user interface than most people know what to...Read More

August 8th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
A team of scientists at Binghamton University in New York State have developed a technique that lets them salvage material from old CDs to make flexible biosensors that are inexpensive and relatively simple to produce. The method involves using a chemical process and sticky tape to peel off the metal coating from the disks, and then using a crafting cutter to shape the flexible material as required. The flexible sensors can be applied to the skin and can send a variety of data to a smartphone via Bluetooth, including pH,...Read More
Lumen is the first device and app available to anyone that provides real-time feedback on whether you’re burning carbohydrates or fats. These measurements are usually only made for athletes or patients through special testing centers, hospitals, or clinics, but with Lumen they are now available to everyone, anywhere. Nutrition is a very individualized topic, while metabolism is just as nuanced – one size does not fit all when it comes to diet and nutrition plans – and that’s why dieticians and nutrition coaches can play an important role in health...Read More

August 3rd, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Scientists at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and partners at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin have developed a silicone heart model that is intended to model heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The device, which represents a ‘mock circulatory loop’, includes a simulated version of the left atrium and left ventricle, and each chamber is independently controlled to model the entire cardiac cycle. The researchers use air pressure in a surrounding chamber to induce the device to pump, in much the same way that...Read More

August 2nd, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Columbia University scientists and collaborators at Rover Diagnostics have created a rapid PCR test that can be used at the point of care. Weighing in at two pounds, the portable device can rival the sensitivity and accuracy of traditional lab-based PCR testing equipment, but providing results in as little as 23 minutes. The new device includes miniaturized optical components and relies on plasmonic thermocycling. This involves using infrared light to excite plasmonic nanoparticles in the samples, generating gentle heating, and increasing the speed of the process compared with conventional thermocyclers....Read More

August 1st, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia engineered a new spray coating for surfaces that provides long-term protection against bacterial and viral contamination. The material is intended as a long-term alternative to disinfectant sprays and combines hydrophobic properties with antimicrobial nanoparticles to reduce microbial contamination. The hydrophobicity of the coating prevents liquid droplets from spreading over the surface, helping to prevent biofilm formation and microbial colonization. If the coating becomes damaged, reducing its hydrophobic properties, a second line of defense in the form of nanoparticles containing bactericidal zinc ions...Read More
Bodyport, a medtech company based in San Francisco, developed the Bodyport Cardiac Scale, a set of weighing scales that can non-invasively assess fluid status and heart function. The scales can detect these signals through the feet when a patient steps onto the device. The technology is intended to be convenient and requires only 20 seconds each morning, and should easily lend itself to integration into a daily routine.    The device can transmit the data on cardiac hemodynamic parameters to clinicians through cellular networks, and uses AI-based algorithms to identify...Read More

July 29th, 2022 by Conn Hastings
Scientists at Rice University developed a system to wirelessly and rapidly activate specific brain circuits using magnetic fields. The technology has been developed in fruit flies, a common experimental animal, but the researchers hope that it could help in understanding the brain and to develop new treatments for neurological disorders in humans. The technology involves genetically modified fruit flies that express heat sensitive ion channels in specific brain circuits. The researchers inject magnetic nanoparticles into the flies and then cause them to heat up using magnetic fields. This heat activates...Read More

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Medicine

Upcycling CDs as Flexible Biosensors

A team of scientists at Binghamton University in New York State have developed a technique that lets them salvage material from old CDs to make flexible biosensors... August 8th, 2022

Cardiology

Silicone Heart Models Heart Failure

Scientists at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and partners at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin have developed a silicone heart model that... August 3rd, 2022

Surgery

Emergency Medicine

Radiology

Ultrasound Sticker for 48 Hours of Imaging

Engineers at MIT have created an ultrasound patch that can provide long-term ultrasound imaging of internal organs and structures. The device contains a rigid... August 11th, 2022

Magnetic Steering System for Guidewires

Percutaneous coronary intervention is an incredibly useful technique to minimally invasively investigate and treat cardiac issues, such as blockages in the coronary... June 28th, 2022

Anesthesiology

Finger Clip for Blood Pressure Monitoring

At the University of Missouri a team of researchers developed a custom finger clip device that can continuously measure a variety of vitals, including blood... January 5th, 2022

Holler Box